• With Millicent Furniture, a collection of handmade wooden furnishings that blends modernist forms with Southwestern materials and motifs, Henry has created a meeting ground between her bohemian childhood and more structured adult years.

  • "It is an unexpected fusion of several different influences. Emily creates an elegant, soulful collection, blending modernist values, contemporary culture, and old-school handcraft."

  • “She became a champion of Hispanic and Native American arts and really brought the Southwest to the rest of the world. I always aim to capture that free-spirited elegance that Millicent Rogers and Taos in general represent. I want my pieces to evoke the Southwest without screaming Southwestern.”

  • "She grew up on the edge of the Taos Pueblo, and along the acequias dense thickets of wild plum grew."

  • "We asked northern New Mexico native Emily Henry, the woman behind Millicent furniture, to share her favorite haunts, shops and eats with us."

  • "Her pieces are sought after and very expensive, but she says, ’True elegance knows no limitations.’"

  • “In order to make something of the highest quality you have to start with the tree,” Henry says. “Our products—credenzas, cabinets, tables—are solid wood, and all the building and finishing are done by hand.”

  • "Each of Millicent’s impressive designs seem to be popping out of the furniture and are a sure way to awe buyers. The unique style of Henry’s furniture is a true refection of the artistic and cultural city where it is developed."

  • "Millicent designer Emily Henry creates heirloom-quality furniture that respects the past but lives in the present."

  • "Millicent first began taking shape when the interior designers clients began asking for unique custom pieces. So, Henry began designing them."

  • "Henry creates hand-carved modern Americana pieces featuring poplar and brass in the hope, she says, of 'Reviving and updating the Northern New Mexico wood working cottage industry'."

  • "Henry's designs are inspired by memories and stories, especially of her youth growing up in Taos."

  • "The history of the Southwest is dying out, and it was important to me to use artistry to preserve it."

  • “My upbringing was intensely creative and free-styling”, Henry said, “Uninhibited and full of adventure … gathering arrowheads and potsherds and exploring the haunted and mysterious back roads of Taos,” adding, “On the one hand, there was almost unlimited freedom to explore and create. On the other, there was a heavy responsibility to fend for one’s self.”

  • "The spectacular result of this creative soul-searching is a line of dramatically chiseled consoles, side tables, and desks made from poplar, walnut, and pine."

  • "The design of the birds and carving style for the wires on 'Meeting in Gallup' door are a nod to Hispanic and Native American cultures in the Southwest."

  • "The environment plays heavily into Henry’s furniture, a line of poplar and pine credenzas and side tables that are hand-carved with stylized local motifs: wild plum blossoms, cactus pads, and pigeons on a wire that Henry—with a little shuffle resembling a Native American tribal dance—refers to as Navajo birds."